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Use of Municipal Wastewater in Plain Cement Concrete Construction Work

Book by Islam Ul-Haque from 55 PM Long Course 


Generally reuse of municipal wastewater is restricted for irrigation purposes only, whereas, the same can be used in plain cement concrete construction works without compromising the compressive strength. The main objectionable ingredient in municipal wastewater is the presence of sulfates which degrade concrete strength. In order to investigate the utility of municipal wastewater in concrete works, a study with the objectives of characterizing wastewater and its effects on plain cement concrete strength was designed at Faisalabad Pakistan, in the Laboratory. The sulfate constituents, found in the municipal waste water, is the major ingredients that affects the strength of concrete, i.e. 176 Kg / cm2 and 224 Kg / cm2 for municipal wastewater (MWW) and normal tap water respectively. The wide range of compressive strengths emanating from different combinations of municipal wastewater (MWW) provides its uses in different concrete construction activities of various strengths / loadings requirements. Basing on the results from the study, it can be envisaged that use of waste water in the construction industry can save up to 16 % the fresh water.

Publishing house: LAP LAMBERT Academic Publishing
ISBN-13: 978-3-8433-6234-4, ISBN-10: 3843362343, EAN: 9783843362344



Use of Municipal Wastewater in Plain Cement Concrete, Construction Works

Generally reuse of municipal wastewater is restricted for irrigation purposes only, whereas, the same can be used in plain cement concrete construction works without compromising the compressive strength. The main objectionable ingredient in municipal wastewater is the presence of sulfates which degrade concrete strength. In order to investigate the utility of municipal wastewater in concrete works, a study with the objectives of characterizing wastewater and its effects on plain cement concrete strength was designed at Faisalabad (FWO construction site laboratory).

Four categories of water samples (Tap water, Primary Treated wastewater, 50%Tap water + 50% municipal wastewater and municipal wastewater) only were used in the plain cement concrete cylinders which were tested for compressive strength, having 7, 21 and 28 days curing age. It was found that municipal wastewater after primary treatment, if used in the mixing process of plain cement concrete, provides compressive strength ranging from 204 to 210 Kg / cm2.                                                                                                                 

The comparison of compressive strength obtained through various trials envisages that the recommended minimum compressive strength of concrete is 210 Kg/cm2 (3000 psi ), and the compressive strength achieved by using primary treated water comes to be 216 Kg/ cm2 ( 28 days curing) which is more than the minimum required compressive strength.

The compressive strength achieved by using municipal wastewater (MWW) is 176 Kg/cm2 (28 days) which is less than the minimum requirement. The compressive strength achieved by using 50 % tap water and 50 %MWW is 209 Kg /cm2 (28 days), which is very near to the minimum required compressive strength.
The sulfate constituents, found in the municipal waste water, is the major ingredients that affects the strength of concrete, i.e. 176 Kg / cm2 and 224 Kg / cm2 for municipal wastewater (MWW) and normal tap water respectively. The wide range of compressive strengths emanating from different combinations of municipal wastewater (MWW) provides its uses in different concrete construction activities of various strengths / loadings requirements.

Basing on the preliminary results obtained from the study, it can be envisaged that the use of waste water in the construction industry can save upto 16 % the fresh water, which is otherwise being used in the construction works.

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posted by S A J Shirazi @ 2:54 PM,

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